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Life of a Brown Person: watched Precious for the first time…

so, admittedly, the screenplay isn’t that great nor is the acting, the story line is really simple and music etcetc.

HOWEVER. as a movie that highlights what black woman face, in certain economic, educational, psychological circumstances I think it touches on things that Black Men do not acknowledge and those who know about “Black Struggle” from a commercialized standpoint do not see.

I always dislike how the Black Male Struggle is always something talked about, but the Black Female Struggle is ignored and shoved under the rug because “WE HAVE TO UPHOLD OUR BLACK MEN. ENCOURAGE THEM TO NOT BE INCARCERATED. TO MAKE IT TO COLLEGE.”

Though the movie is not as great-Monique had a moment when she goes, “He was makin love to me and touchin my daughter. I told him to stop but he told my fat ass to shutup so I shut my fat ass up and he touched her…I was mad that my man wanted my daughter not me.”

Sexual abuse is not commonly talked about…for what reason I don’t know but there should always be open forums about the treatment of women, and of course including us of color because our struggles seem to always be swept under the rug…

SNL Teaches Us 'Diversity' Means Assimilation

Stokely Carmichael

Mighty Hannibal: The late, great funk showman you

Black Conservative Columnist: End Black History Month

Black History Month: a wretched 28-day miseducation of American children in public schools who arent told about all the bad things blacks are able to get away with today, and who are force-fed factually flawed (if not completely fictional) history about how bad slavery was. At least thats how Mychal Massie, a black conservative, views it. The columnist and pundit penned a piece for World Net Daily, published Monday, describing the evils of the month.

"Feb. 1 began the 28 day ‘ceremony to injustice’ that is nothing more than an aversion to modernity that encourages people to mire themselves in the past juxtaposed to embracing the present and the future," Massie, who is also the former chair of the Project 21 National Leadership Network of Black Conservatives, writes.

"Black History Month is used by the nefarious and the corrupt to divide, to evoke blame and guilt, and often for personal gain. Public school children will be immersed in a 28-day vat of a factually flawed and at times fictional history of how bad the blacks had it in America, and they will hear that whites are privileged and their ancestors had slaves, blah-blah-blah."

To prove his point, Massie claims that the things you truly won’t hear about are harmful transgressions of black people such as the “knockout game,” for which blacks aren’t “shot on sight.” This surely proves that America is more tolerant, he states, but that won’t be talked about in the classroom.

"They won’t be talking about the fact that blacks aren’t shot on sight in areas where ‘Knockout’ is taking place. For those unfamiliar, the Knockout game is what black thugs play where they suddenly and unexpectedly punch unsuspecting white persons in the face for sport," he says. 

"The physical injuries and emotional trauma white victims suffer during these attacks are viewed as ‘minor,’ and in the majority of cases, the attacks don’t even make it on the evening news or into the newspapers … And it is paramount to note that these attacks are taking place across America—and it’s happening outside the ghetto. I’d say that shows America has advanced a long way because, according to the racialists flooding the classrooms and airwaves, blacks were barely suffered to walk on the same sidewalk with whites."

Massie also complains that while Trayvon Martin “will be lauded for sainthood … as an example of white injustice,” after George Zimmerman shot and killed him, white victims who were murdered at the hands of black offenders would go unnoticed for the month. 

"You won’t hear that the same black man in the White House, who was quick to stir the caldron of racial animus in the Martin situation, has refused numerous attempts by the families of these two British students, tourists who had wandered into the neighborhood where [Shawn] Tyson gunned them down in cold blood because they were white, to show them a modicum of compassion," Massie writes.

One thing Massie fails to mention was that Zimmerman was not initially charged in Trayvon’s death, and was only brought to court after huge national outcry. In the end he was also acquitted for the murder. Tyson, however, was sentenced to life in prison in 2011 for the murders of James Cooper and James Kouzaris.

Massie then—after slamming the president, Attorney General Eric Holder and the NAACP—calles for the end of Black History month, saying he is tired of the lies the month helps perpetuate.

"I’m tired of the lies—charlatans posing as eruditionists and parroting myths and distortions about what slavery was or wasn’t. Jim Crow is over, and the only overt segregation taking place today is perpetrated by black groups such as the Congressional Black Caucus, the Nation of Islam and the New Black Panthers," he says. "Slavery has become a crutch for blacks. It is the excuse used for retreating from modernity. Slavery happened; the United States had the good sense and decency to move beyond it. Now it’s time blacks got over it and moved forward."

"It’s time to send Black History Month to the ash heaps of history. It’s time to teach all children factual history, not just a manufactured history used to force guilt on white students and victim status on black students. It’s time we teach students that blacks do not own the market on past suffering and injustice. It’s time we teach that every population group who arrived here had extremely difficult times at first, but, unlike the majority of blacks, they rose above it," he adds.

Weather Woman Fired After Defending Natural Hair And Black Kids Has No Regrets

Empire of Necessity: Historian Greg Grandin on Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World

http://www.democracynow.org - In his new book, “The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World,” acclaimed historian Greg Grandin examines how the transnational slave trade transformed the world, causing mass economic, social and political upheaval in ways that continue to reverberate today. Grandin tells the true story of a slave insurrection aboard a ship named the Tryal in 1805, in which West African men and women rose up and seized the vessel. The uprising inspired Herman Melville to write his novella “Benito Cereno” that drew on the memoirs of Captain Delano, a distant relative of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Today, Grandin has used the dramatic incident to show how slavery was the “flywheel” that drove the global development of everything from trade and insurance to technology, religion and medicine for nearly four centuries. A professor of Latin American history at New York University, Grandin’s last book “Fordlandia,” was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history. 

Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,200+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET at http://www.democracynow.org.

Through A Lens Darkly: How African Americans Use Photography to Shape Their Cultural Representation

http://www.democracynow.org - A new film explores how African American communities have used the medium of photography to shape how they are represented. “Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People” is directed and produced by Thomas Allen Harris, who shares his own family’s history in the film. Allen Harris is also the creator of the related project, the Digital Diaspora Family Road Show. Both were inspired in part by the book, “Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present” by Deborah Willis, who also produced the film. Allen Harris joins us from the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, where his movie is having its premiere.

Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,200+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET at http://www.democracynow.org.

Life of a Brown Person: yes I’m hangin with a white dude…why you lookin mad salty?

So when I hang with my white friends it generally has never come to my attention of it being a problem…then again a lot of times they’re white females.

One of my friends is a white and as of late I’ve noticed the change in which people pay attention to us chillin.

For example we were wandering in a museum and chillin, every security guard that happened to be of color took a notice, double taked.

This happened when we were chillin round some bars, and it’s increasingly beginning to annoy the shit out of me. 

I get it, interracial…wow that’s such a new thing. Yeah ya know cause it’s never happened before, shit most black folk don’t even consider me to be black soo….now it’s a thing? Now people have problems? 

Life of a Brown Person: beauty is a damn fight.

  • my hands are tiny and bony,
  • but when I put on my chori and rings they look like beauty, they look like a part of me.
  • I’ve got super irritating acne, so sometimes in the morning/night I stand in the mirror and pop um or poke um hoping they disappear one day.
  • But when I wear some shit, I stand in the mirror feelin on my booty goin “damn I loookk goooodddd”

  • when my hair was fluffy and to my back I’d spend half an hour on it trying to make it to things to the point where my hands would cramp up and shake.
  • but then I shaved it, cut it, and now some days I can just put it up and it’ll look good.
  • sometimes I’ll see images of make-up infused models, or real chics in life with nice lookin make up
  • but the minor eyeliner, eyeshadow, lipstick and henna makes me feel just as equivalent…when I feel like it.

  • I love boobies and I fall into the fantasy of “the bigger the booby the mo the betta” because of these hypersexualized milf-like images
  • but I’ll jiggle mine around and stick um in a crop top and they’ll look nice.
  • I was called chicken legs, pole, twig as a kid/high schooler
  • I look at my calves now and love how goddamn muscular they are.

We’re human. We have our moments where these images, the people we see, the jealousy of beauty affect our own-but then we have to remind ourselves that…those images are based off of someone elses standards, basis of beauty qualifications n fucknots.

I have my moments…and then I don’t. It’s good to admit um.

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Freedom Summer: How Civil Rights Activists Braved Violence to Challenge Racism in 1964 Mississippi

http://www.democracynow.org - Hundreds of people marched in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, on Wednesday to mark the 50th anniversary of Freedom Day. On Jan. 22, 1964, Fannie Lou Hamer and other civil rights activists marched around the Forrest County Courthouse in support of black voting rights. The rally was the beginning of a historic year in Mississippi. Months later civil rights groups launched Freedom Summer. More than 1,000 out-of-state volunteers traveled to Mississippi to help register voters and set up what they called, “Freedom Schools.” Out of Freedom Summer grew the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party that challenged the legitimacy of the white-only Mississippi Democratic Party at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. The period also saw the murders of three civil rights activists — Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney. Events are being held across Mississippi in 2014 to mark the 50th anniversary of this historic year. We are joined by Stanley Nelson, director of the new documentary, “Freedom Summer.” An Emmy Award-winning MacArthur Genius fellow, Nelson’s past films include “Freedom Riders” and “The Murder of Emmett Till.”

Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,200+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET at http://www.democracynow.org.

2014 Will be the Year of Black Women on TV

She’s got a point. When it comes to reflecting what this country really looks like, television lags behind real life. Far behind. It’s hard to believe that before Kerry Washington made her Scandal debut in 2012, the last time a black woman starred in a network drama was 1974 (Get Christie Love! starring the late Tamara Dobson). 



Read more: The Year of Black Women on TV | Fast forward | OZY 

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